Politics, Policy & Media it's all connected.

Post-truth politics and facts

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With media gatekeeping being the topic of my previous post, this article brought up some points that are worth retreading. In many ways, it is a lament for the death of gatekeeping and a statement against what has been described as “post-truth politics”.

This was the first major vote in the era of post-truth politics: the listless remain campaign attempted to fight fantasy with facts, but quickly found that the currency of fact had been badly debased.

Correctly, the article ties this into the prevailing distrust of experts. It also brings social media into play, and bemoans the fact that,

In the news feed on your phone, all stories look the same – whether they come from a credible source or not. And, increasingly, otherwise-credible sources are also publishing false, misleading, or deliberately outrageous stories. “Clickbait is king, so newsrooms will uncritically print some of the worst stuff out there, which lends legitimacy to bullshit,”

I have sympathy for both these views, but from a campaigning perspective the implications are clear, particularly if you represent a mainstream organisation that would traditionally rely on mainstream media networks and conventional messaging. The two key points are:

  • Facts and experts have their place but the use of these must connect with the audience. They must be presented in a way that is:
    • personally relevant to the audience,
    • connects emotionally,
    • and be sufficiently consequential to their lives to influence their decision.
  • If the media is no longer a reliable (if tacit) partner for campaigns, then the onus is on the campaign to maximise outreach and engagement via its own media platforms. Owned social media becomes the crucial publishing platform in this scenario.

About the author

Rajit Hewagama
Rajit Hewagama

A highly experienced digital strategist, with an extensive background in social media marketing and e-commerce and has served as an online communications strategist for national level political and cause-based
campaigns.

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Rajit Hewagama By Rajit Hewagama
Politics, Policy & Media it's all connected.

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